How to get your podcast artwork onto iTunes

If you’re having  a problem getting your podcast image to display properly on iTunes ,  I found a link to a video tutorial that might be helpful. The video was created in 2012 when the minimum size of an image for your podcast needed to be 600 x 600 pixels. iTunes has now changed the minimum size to 1400 x 1400  — with a maximum size of 3000 x 3000 pixels. 

Here is the link to the video that you may find helpful: http://www.incomepress.com/podcast-image-artwork-itunes 

And here is the link (which you may already have seen) to iTunes specifications: https://help.apple.com/itc/podcasts_connect/#/itc1723472cb 

We’ve used various stock photo websites through the years  for images. I like Adobe’s library. It’s not free, but it vast and fairly reasonable.  

I hope this helps you prepare your podcast artwork for iTunes. If you need help with the editing and enhancing of your podcast, or you want a cool intro and outro, we hope you’ll check us out at Audiobag.

How to remove a spike (crackle or pop) noise in your podcast

Click to enlarge

I was listening to a podcast the other day on one of my late afternoon walks (yes, we can take walks in the middle of winter here in Central Texas), and I was amazed that the podcast had an annoying spike noise throughout the show. I contacted the podcaster and offered up some quick advice on how to easily remove the noise. I thought I’d pass it along here as well.

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How to have a cleaner sounding phone interview

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Actual screenshot of the audio samples in this post. Notice how the guest’s volume is much louder (in fact, it’s overmodulated) than the interviewer’s volume.

When recording a phone interview for your podcast, one of the smartest things you can do is to put your microphone source (that’s you) on one track of your recording (track one), and your phone input source (your guest) on another track (for example, track two). Feed track one to the left channel recording input in your recording software program, and feed  track two to the right channel recording input. In other words, you’ll be on the left channel and your guest will be on the right channel of a stereo recording. That way, if your guest makes unwanted noise while you’re speaking, you or your audio engineer can mute your guest’s recorded track in post production (and vice versa in case you make unwanted noise).Let’s listen to a before and after example of what I’m talking about.

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Who says podcast listeners like to hear mistakes?

Click to enlarge view of audio in Sony SpectraLayers

 

The goal of a post-production podcast engineer is to make a podcast sound the very best it can. It’s a time-consuming job, often taking days. Some podcasters try to justify leaving noise and verbal flubs in a podcast by saying it makes it sound more authentic. Frankly, that’s an excuse for being lazy and not caring about your listener to give them your very best. Would you like watching a movie if the director decided to leave in mistakes? I doubt it. Podcast listeners want quality audio, too. But how do you achieve that?

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When radio towers become obsolete


towerIt’s a cold hard fact that making money is more important to radio station owners and investors than being the best they can be. Don’t get me wrong. Making money is vital. However, when making money trumps being your best, radio stations become mediocre. The proof is in the production room where sloppy mistake-ridden commercials make it to the air, and in the control room where fewer and fewer actual live shows occur because shows are voice-tracked days in advance. So the DJ forgoes being fun or interesting and instead reads uninteresting PSAs or station promos (which most listeners could care less about) in order to quickly whip through the six shows he needs to record in one sitting.

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Observations from a waiting room

Today I’m writing this post in a dentist’s waiting room where I brought my 93 year-old mother for her appointment. Life is a cycle. I remember her taking me to the dentist back in my childhood. Now I’m the one taking her. The waiting room is quite nice with everything looking perfect. Perfectly painted walls, perfectly chosen wall hangings, perfectly selected wood flooring, and perfectly selected visual branding in the office area (so you’ll know to whom to write the check). There’s one thing that’s not perfect, though.

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