Tips on recording a podcast

peoplepodcastingIf you’re a podcaster and you’re not quite sure what settings you should use for recording your show, I can shed some light on that for you. First, if you’re recording just your own voice, you only need to record in monaural (no need for a stereo track). If you’re recording yourself and a guest, use two microphones and a separate track for you and a separate track for your guest if possible. Having two separate tracks makes it easier to mute each track when the other person is talking — knocking out thumps and paper shuffling. Now let’s move on to what sampling rate you should use.

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How do you know if you have great radio imaging?

Radio imaging can make or break a station. If your voice talent sounds confident and in control, your station will sound professional. If your voice talent sounds weak, you’ll sound amateurish. If there are too many zaps, lasers, and explosions in your radio sweepers, you’ll sound annoying. If you use rock music in your sweepers on a country station, you’ll sound like you don’t know your target audience. And if you say the same things other stations say in their liners, you’re plagiarizing.

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How to get your podcast artwork onto iTunes

If you’re having  a problem getting your podcast image to display properly on iTunes ,  I found a link to a video tutorial that might be helpful. The video was created in 2012 when the minimum size of an image for your podcast needed to be 600 x 600 pixels. iTunes has now changed the minimum size to 1400 x 1400  — with a maximum size of 3000 x 3000 pixels. 

Here is the link to the video that you may find helpful: http://www.incomepress.com/podcast-image-artwork-itunes 

And here is the link (which you may already have seen) to iTunes specifications: https://help.apple.com/itc/podcasts_connect/#/itc1723472cb 

We’ve used various stock photo websites through the years  for images. I like Adobe’s library. It’s not free, but it vast and fairly reasonable.  

I hope this helps you prepare your podcast artwork for iTunes. If you need help with the editing and enhancing of your podcast, or you want a cool intro and outro, we hope you’ll check us out at Audiobag.

How to remove a spike (crackle or pop) noise in your podcast

Click to enlarge

I was listening to a podcast the other day on one of my late afternoon walks (yes, we can take walks in the middle of winter here in Central Texas), and I was amazed that the podcast had an annoying spike noise throughout the show. I contacted the podcaster and offered up some quick advice on how to easily remove the noise. I thought I’d pass it along here as well.

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How to have a cleaner sounding phone interview

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Actual screenshot of the audio samples in this post. Notice how the guest’s volume is much louder (in fact, it’s overmodulated) than the interviewer’s volume.

When recording a phone interview for your podcast, one of the smartest things you can do is to put your microphone source (that’s you) on one track of your recording (track one), and your phone input source (your guest) on another track (for example, track two). Feed track one to the left channel recording input in your recording software program, and feed  track two to the right channel recording input. In other words, you’ll be on the left channel and your guest will be on the right channel of a stereo recording. That way, if your guest makes unwanted noise while you’re speaking, you or your audio engineer can mute your guest’s recorded track in post production (and vice versa in case you make unwanted noise).Let’s listen to a before and after example of what I’m talking about.

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Who says podcast listeners like to hear mistakes?

Click to enlarge view of audio in Sony SpectraLayers

 

The goal of a post-production podcast engineer is to make a podcast sound the very best it can. It’s a time-consuming job, often taking days. Some podcasters try to justify leaving noise and verbal flubs in a podcast by saying it makes it sound more authentic. Frankly, that’s an excuse for being lazy and not caring about your listener to give them your very best. Would you like watching a movie if the director decided to leave in mistakes? I doubt it. Podcast listeners want quality audio, too. But how do you achieve that?

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Check your pronunciation and emphasis when recording your voice

When I’m on vacation in Canada, I often hear “eh” at the end of every sentence. “Beautiful day, eh?” Then there’s my favorite question,”You’re not from around here, eh?” I hear that when I accidentally use the word “y’all” in a sentence — like when I asked a nice Canadian family sitting outdoors at a restaurant in downtown Bobcaygeon, Ontario, “Are the black flies eating y’all up over there at your table?” You may be wondering where this is going. It’s all aboooot watching your pronunciation and colloquialisms when recording your voice.

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